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Pasta is What Happens While You’re Making Other Plans*

*Or, Easy Creamy Kabocha-Sage Pasta (or Bean) Bake
*Or, All You Need Is Squash

[Before I get to today’s post, I wanted to let y’all know about Vegan MoFo (Month of Food), a blogging event that runs throughout the month of October.  MoFo encourages blofgers to post about vegan recipes or food-related issues each day (and you don’t have to be vegan to participate–just be sure your posts are vegan for this one month).  I participated last year, and it was so much fun!  I knew I’d never be able to keep up this year, what with teaching two new courses at the college, so I signed on to do a couple of guest posts over at the xgfx blog instead (and I’ll let you know when they’re up over there).  If you’d like to learn more, read about some of the nearly 700 (!!) participating bloggers, or sign up yourself, check out the Vegan MoFo main site. ] 

I vividly remember the evening I first learned about the Beatles.  I was barely into grade school; it was  Sunday night and, like every other weekend, my parents were watching The Ed Sullivan Show.

The only TV in our house was in my parents’ bedroom, perched on the wide dresser that sat opposite their bed. The small pathway between the foot of the bed and the dresser provided the seating area for us children.  With so little room between the two pieces of furniture that your calves would press up against the bedding when you pulled one of drawers fully open, watching TV meant that we kids had to sit cross-legged, necks craned up at a dentist-chair angle so we could watch the small screen while my parents stretched out on the bed above our heads. I was so accustomed to that seating arrangement that even when alone in the house, I’d sit on the floor to gaze up at the TV.

On the night in question I must have been playing in another room when the Fab Four hit the airwaves because I recall my dad calling to me from the bedroom.

“Ric, get in here, I have to ask you something,” he bellowed, and I trotted into the room.  He was reclining with his head against the pillow, legs outstretched and crossed at the ankles, his corduroy slippers dangling from his toes.

“Look at this,” he said, motioning to the television.  “Tell me, are those boys, or are those girls?”

I looked at the screen, the four black-and white moptops strumming guitars and tapping their feet to deafening shrieks from the audience. Even at the tender age of five, I knew better than to contradict my father.  Little white lie: “Um. . . girls?” I ventured.

“You see?!” he cried, nudging my mother beside him on the bed.  “Who has hair like that?  They look like a bunch of thugs!”

Unlike The Nurse, who loved John Lennon at first sight, it took me a while to fall for the Beatles.  In fact, it wasn’t until my late teens that I finally bought my first Beatles album,** Hey Jude, which contained the songs “Lady Madonna” and “Paperback Writer,” both of which I loved (okay: lifelong dream of being a writer–“Paperback Writer” makes sense.  But “Lady Madonna”? What the–??). I was just as devastated as everyone else when John Lennon was shot by Mark David Chapman outside the Dakota.  By then, I’d come to appreciate Lennon more for his stance as a peacenik than his music (because while Double Fantasy may have been genius in theory, there are definitely fewer of Yoko’s tracks worth listening to. . . okay, that was a second white lie: I mean, is there actually anyone on the planet who would ever listen to any of her so-called “songs”?). When John philosophized, “Life is what happens while you’re busy making other plans,” the statement resonated with me, big time.

As a teen, I knew that I’d never want to live like my dad, toiling 6 days a week with no vacation for the first 25 years of his working life–that seemed far too heavy on the “making other plans” aspect and far too light on the “life is what happens” one (and how ironic, isn’t it, that I am now someone who generally works every day of the week.  The universe has such a warped sense of humor, doesn’t it?).

 Sometimes–say, after an entire weekend marking essays, or when the HH walks through the door at the end of the workday and I realize I’ve barely moved from the computer since he left at 8:30 in the morning, or when I spend 3 hours in the car just so I can drive to my doctor’s office for her to hand me a little slip of paper so I can go see a different, more specialized doctor on a different day four months later (and you think you want our healthcare system, Americans? Are you insane, people?!)–well, on those days, I totally know what Lennon meant by that lyric.

Other days, though, the “making other plans” part, in itself, bestows us with the full richness of life, right while it’s happening.  Like when I spend time musing with The Nurse about where it would be fun to retire (she’s almost there already) and exchange stories about our vacation in the Maritimes and the cozy, scenic little B&Bs at which we stayed.  Like sharing a chat with Gemini II about which play we should see when we get together next week, leading to a protracted reminiscence about the stage shows we used to put on as kids or the fun we had at our high school reunion a couple of summers ago.  Like planning out my next blog post or mentally sampling new recipe combinations while I stomp around with The Girls on the trail, inhaling the scent of pine cones and musty autumn leaves as our feet crunch over them on the path. All while being fully engaged, sharing life with loved ones, relishing the moments.

I love dishes that can be prepped and then popped in the oven, or set on the stove and forgotten for a time.  This casserole does exactly that:  it’s a snap to whip up the sauce, which is subsequently mixed with uncooked pasta, left in the oven, and baked.  Combining my favorite squash, kabocha (known in these parts as Buttercup) with seasonal sage, this is a perfect dish to offset the suddenly chilly weather (all right, third white lie: it can’t improve the weather, but it sure does elevate your mood).  To me, the texture resembles that of mac and cheese, with the additional sweetness of kabocha; cashews provide luxurious creaminess and sage supplies its own unique shot of umami. The dish can be served alongside the most elegant dinner as a side dish (especially if you opt for the lima bean option), or scooped out on a big plate as an entrée on its own.

Next time you find yourself with some time on your hands, prep this pasta first; then go off and make your other plans.  Pasta will happen; and life is bound to happen, too. So why not enjoy something rich and silky as you navigate your way through?

SOS Kitchen Challenge Update:  You asked for it, you got it!  The SOS Kitchen Challenge returns–tomorrow!  Kim and I are both crazy about this month’s ingredient and I’ve been enjoying leftovers of my recent recipe using it over the past few days.  Check back tomorrow morning for the ingredient reveal!

**Kids, that’s a big, DVD-like black vinyl disc on which we used to play music.  On a something that looked like a big hat box with a floating metal arm, called a “record player.”

This recipe is being submitted to Amy’s Slightly Indulgent Tuesdays event.

Last Year at this Time: September SOS Kitchen Challenge Roundup:  Apples!

Two Years Ago: Book Review & Recipes: Clean Food by Terry Walters (gluten free, some ACD friendly)

Three Years Ago: Other People’s Munchies

© Ricki Heller, Diet Dessert and Dogs

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32 comments to Pasta is What Happens While You’re Making Other Plans*

  • Great minds think alike, my post on deck for Wednesday is a butternut squash sauce with cashews in it, which ate on gnocchi. So, not the same, but similar in many ways 🙂 I love how yours turned out baked.

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    It’s such a great combo, isn’t it? 🙂

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  • Thank you for info on kabocha squash! I’ve been wondering what it was because I’ve never seen a squash with that name, but buttercup squash are plentiful at my favorite farm stand 🙂

    I’ve made a couple squash/pasta dishes in the past but haven’t tried any yet this year. This sounds yum! Love the idea of the lima beans. I’ve been using more beans instead of grains(esp in pasta dishes) or even soy (tofu), and they’ve been a great sub. Don’t think I’d have thought of the lima beans though. Such an underrated little bean 😉

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    I agree–totally underrated! They were creamy, starchy (in a good way) and perfect in this sauce. 🙂

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  • Oh my Ricki, this looks RIGHT up my alley! I just know my husband and I would be gaga for this. Will make soon, soon!
    Even though we’re still just pretending it’s Fall around these parts (Austin, TX). 🙂
    xx,
    e

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    I only WISH we were just pretending it were fall over here! Fall wouldn’t be so bad, if only winter didn’t follow it. . . ! Glad you like the pasta. 🙂

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  • squash is definitely required for the cooler (ok, cold) months, it’s the only thing that keeps me going! haha, ok, maybe not only, but… u know what i mean 🙂 fabulous dish!

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    I do understand what you mean. . . I think I might despair totally without squash! 😉

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  • ha ha, first of all, I LOVE the title of this post. Pasta is totally what happens for me when I am busy making other plans. So true! also, I am a big time fan of the kabocha squash. It is for sure my #1 winter squash. So silky smooth and super yums!

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    I couldn’t agree more! Once I discovered kabocha, it was love, love. 🙂

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  • I love that you said pasta or beans… because while I wont eat pasta, I will eat beans with gusto!! 🙂 Can’t wait to see what the SOS reveal with bring tomorrow. 🙂

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    I bet you could do something really spectacular with beans and this sauce, Janet! Let me know if you give it a try. 🙂

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  • oh you have filled me with a need for sage – last time I drove myself crazy looking for the my dried sage because the supermarket had none so this may need to wait – though I do love the sound of dried pasta in a bake

    And love your beatles story – they were merely in the background in my childhood but at some stage we had the music to all their songs and used to play them on piano – your dad’s comment made me laugh

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    Thanks, Johanna. I seem to be drawn to sage only in cooler weather. Once I discovered the flavor of fresh sage, I really have been spoiled and much prefer it, but dried has its place, too. 🙂

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  • This looks so spectacular, Ricki! And perfect for these it’s-technicall;\y-Spring-but-cold-and-rainy days 🙂

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    Now that you mention it, it IS a great cross-season dish! 🙂

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  • Mmmm it looks so smooth and creamy! I specially love that you topped it with bread crumbles for that extra crunch 🙂

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    You know, the breadcrumbs were good, but personally I preferred it without!

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  • Okay, this sounds amazing Ricki. My kids love a creamy pasta so I think I’ll test it out on them. Maybe I should leave the sage out for the kid version? What on earth would we do without cashews or squash?

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    I know–cashews are my favorite “make it creamy” ingredient! (oh, wait, maybe coconut milk. . . ) 😀 You could use just a wee bit of sage instead, or maybe even something more mild like parsley and see how it tastes. Personally, for me the sage “makes it,” but that’s an adult’s taste buds talking!

    [Reply]

  • This is the second vegan butternut squash “cheesy” pasta dish I’ve come across today. Guess someone is sending me a message. 🙂 Looks tasty. And I grew up with the Beatles. Not directly – but my parents are really huge Beatles and McCartney fans. I remember road trips as a child with Wings playing in the tape player. I’m all grown and now have a Wings CD and know most all of the words to every Beatles and Wings song.

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    Thanks, Alta! It’s not actually intended to be “cheesy” at all–the sage sort of takes care of that–but just a lovely, creamy, rich coating. And it was. 😉 And I’ll never forget hearing someone in one of my classes telling a classmate who had asked, “who are the Beatles?” That they were a band “with that guy from Wings.” lol!

    [Reply]

  • Irene

    Mmmm, I made something like this last weekend! Except made a big batch of filling similar to yours with a sweet butternut squash plus white beans with the cashews to get it super rich and creamy. I used it as a filling between rice lasagna noodles and topped it with crushed gluten free crackers (nut thins) for the crunchy topping. Would make a delicious main for Thanksgiving 🙂

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    This sounds fabulous, Irene! I love the idea of using the sauce in lasagna–I am going to HAVE to try that. 🙂

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  • This was scrumdiddliumptious! Made it with roasted butternut squash so it was a little sweet, easily remedied with healthy lashings of Tabasco sauce Also used brown rice rotini, topped with sprouted whole wheat sourdough bread crumbs mixed with a little olive oil…perfect. Thanks for another great recipe Ricki! And we’re having your tempeh curry again tonight. 🙂
    -e

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    So glad you liked it! The kabocha/buttercup is actually one of the sweetest squashes, which is why I chose it–I think the sweet/sage mix is a really delicious one. But tabasco sounds like a great addition! (And thanks for reminding me about that curry. . . I have to make it again!). 🙂

    [Reply]

    Erin Reply:

    Jeez! Could this even get any better?? I had to make this again…adding steamed cauliflower, a handful of edamame, and some additional chunks of roasted butternut squash to your already stellar casserole. Pretty sure I could live on this stuff. 🙂

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    Ricki Reply:

    Now, THAT sounds fantastic! I left it very simple so it could be used as a basic pasta sauce for pretty much anything. . .love how you’ve added to it! 🙂

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  • Fun– I really enjoy the combination of sage and winter squash. I’ve never added nuts, but the seasoned squash (creamy or thick) works beautifully baked with layers of polenta too.

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  • I never think about replacing pasta with beans! I love that idea. And loooooove kabocha squash. We got what I’m hoping is kabocha squash in our CSA this week. So often I go to pick up a kabocha squash and it ends up being buttercup. 🙁

    [Reply]

    Ricki Reply:

    Well, I’ll be darned! Here I’ve been thinking they’re the same thing all this time! I think that means I’ve never tasted a proper kabocha, as I’ve never seen that name listed in any of the stores where I’ve purchased them. . . just buttercup. They must have been twins separated at birth, they look so much alike! 😉

    [Reply]

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